“You’re fired!”

How to not only cope with a layoff, but turn it into an opportunity.

“You’re fired!”

In an article in The Wall Street Journal, reporter Eric Morath discusses the latest data on coronavirus-related terminations in the United States:

US workers filed fewer unemployment applications for the eighth straight week, but the level of claims remained 10 times higher than before the coronavirus pandemic.

Eric Morath on WSJ.com

Although there is a silver lining, the redundancies still affect a large number of employees.

How do you deal with a (increasingly likely) dismissal?


Do you believe that a wave of layoffs is imminent in your company?

Well, more than 50% of employees eventually have a “career derailment” when they get demoted or fired, or their careers flatline. They derail due to a lack of self-awareness, an inability to fix their blind spots or a misalignment with corporate culture. So, time to change some habits!

Executive Carter Cast illustrates employee behavioral problems in five archetypes, and he shows you how to leverage the skills your firm needs (especially now!), understand your motivation and become your own advocate. 

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Image of: The Right – and Wrong – Stuff

The Right – and Wrong – Stuff

Avoid career derailment by developing self-awareness and recognizing your blind spots.

Carter Cast Public Affairs

Before dismissals are issued, executives should carefully consider the consequences (besides the hoped-for, such as reduced costs). Because there are plenty of them. And some of them don’t make the situation better, they make it much worse.

Layoffs, for example, disrupt the psychological contract between workers and employers, making everyone demoralized, depressed and angry. Those who remain on the job after their co-workers are dismissed often experience “layoff survivor sickness,” which leaves them feeling violated and detached. They become afraid to take chances, thus undermining productivity and competitiveness. This is often ignored, so it might be a good time to address the issue. Here you will find everything you need:

Related Summary in getAbstract’s Library
Image of: Healing the Wounds

Healing the Wounds

When layoffs are the norm, people must prepare independently for sequential jobs and organizations must rebuild.

David M. Noer Jossey-Bass Inc. Publishers

If dismissals are really unavoidable, it is the duty of all those involved to make them as consensual and socially acceptable as possible. Useful tips for both sides of the story can be found here:

Related Summary in getAbstract’s Library
Image of: Planning and Managing Layoffs

Planning and Managing Layoffs

A detailed playbook for possibly the hardest thing a leader has to do: laying off blameless employees to stay afloat in times of crisis.

David Ulevitch Andreessen Horowitz

You’ve been fired and you don’t know what to do?

Getting laid off also can signal a time for renewal, starting over and moving ahead in an exciting new direction. getAbstract finds that retirement expert Lita Epstein does a very solid job of showing you how to cope with life after a layoff. She explains how to make the best of a bad situation by taking practical, weekly steps. Her book will help you achieve a heads-up state of preparedness:

Related Summary in getAbstract’s Library
Image of: Surviving a Layoff

Surviving a Layoff

Starting over after a layoff is tough, but after the period of mourning, you can change your career for the better.

Lita Epstein Adams Media

A job loss undermines your whole emotional structure, and it can especially undermine your sense of security if your identity is wrapped up in your job. You need to regain your stability and confidence to get another job and to choose it well. Here is how to do it:

Related Summary in getAbstract’s Library
Image of: You're Fired!

You’re Fired!

You’ve seen him: The dazed man in pinstripes standing outside the building, holding the remains of his career in a cardboard box. And you’ve wondered: “What if that was me?”

Eileen L. Berman, Ed.D. Authority Press

If you are a US citizen, consider taking a look into Richard C. Busse’s Fired, Laid-Off or Forced Out. He answers many questions about US employment laws and how they differ from state to state.

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Image of: Fired, Laid-Off or Forced Out

Fired, Laid-Off or Forced Out

If you fear you’re about to get the ax, begin damage control and protect yourself now.

Richard C. Busse Sphinx Publishing

You want to get a fresh start and make things better next time?

Good! Seek five “career builders” that can help you reach your goals: mentors, relationships, professional counseling, coaching and connections. Here is how to do it:

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Image of: Career Killers, Career Builders

Career Killers, Career Builders

For a successful professional life, avoid five “career killers” and embrace five “career builders.”

John M Crossman Union Square Publishing

You’ll find all you need to be well-prepared for the search for a new challenge in our channel:

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Image of: Job Search

Job Search

The traditional linear career path is fast disappearing. Today, you can navigate the career lattice – moving up, down or sideways within your organization or industry – or you can leap from one career to a completely unrelated career. Or how about starting your own business? Discover the wealth of opportunities available to you.


For further reading

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Image of: The Disposable American

The Disposable American

Every layoff represents individual pain, failed U.S. national policy and corporate strategies driven by stock value.

Louis Uchitelle Knopf Publishing Group
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