“How Do I Respond to a Serious Corporate Crisis?”

Stock market prices are falling, the workforce is threatened with illness – and you have to keep a cool head?

“How Do I Respond to a Serious Corporate Crisis?”

Most crises arrive without warning, so solid preparation is vital, and denial will get you nowhere fast. Here are our five book (and one article) recommendations to get it right – whether as CEO, a manager or the person who spends every single day pondering humankind’s next ground-shaking catastrophes.

1. Facing the wrong, but right

The old saw that anything that can go wrong will go wrong is often true. Is your organization prepared? Studying this book by crisis expert Laurence Barton is a good way to prepare (or to catch up quickly):

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Image of: Crisis Leadership Now

Crisis Leadership Now

In our dangerous world, a disaster can strike at any time, from bank failures to bombings. Is your organization prepared?

Laurence Barton McGraw-Hill Education

Part self-help book, part business book, this useful manual shows you a four-step system for surviving a major problem by “staying frosty, securing support, standing tall” and “saving your future.”

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Image of: The Instant Survivor

The Instant Survivor

How to survive and thrive when faced with a crisis

Jim Moorhead Greenleaf Book Group

When in a serious crisis, put your people first! So support your staff, recover fully, and maintain or rebuild your place in the market. Bill Tibbo provides a go-to resource for companies creating or refining crisis or disaster recovery plans.

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Image of: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm

Leadership in the Eye of the Storm

You may never need to apply these lessons – but if disaster strikes, you’ll be prepared.

Bill Tibbo University of Toronto Press

2. Communication is king

Who could give better communication tips in a serious crisis than consultants Christopher Lehane and Mark Fabiani, who implemented former President Bill Clinton’s damage-control strategy during the Monica Lewinsky scandal? getAbstract recommends their counsel to all who – on a really bad day – might need to act quickly to save their company’s and their own reputation and credibility.

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Image of: Masters of Disaster

Masters of Disaster

A scandal can destroy you or your firm. Learn to control the damage when sparks start to fly.

Christopher Lehane, Mark Fabiani and Bill Guttentag St. Martin’s Press

Three decades in the trenches and on the front lines have given crisis management expert Bill Walker a clear perspective on the ins and outs of crisis communications. He emphasizes truth and transparency, putting the public’s interests ahead of self-preservation and, if possible, surpassing prevailing negative preconceptions. 

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Image of: Crisis Communications in the 24/7 Social Media World

Crisis Communications in the 24/7 Social Media World

Read Twitter to find out about today’s crisis. Read this book to learn effective ways to handle it.

Bill Walker Paramount Market Publishing

3. Even if all else fails, you (and your company) might still be better off than this guy in his daily business

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Image of: The Man Whose Job It Is to Constantly Imagine the Total Collapse of Humanity in Order to Save It

The Man Whose Job It Is to Constantly Imagine the Total Collapse of Humanity in Order to Save It

Vinay Gupta may not be a super hero, but he could still hold the key to saving the world.

Joe Banks Vice News

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